IPB

Здравствуйте, гость ( Вход | Регистрация )


Профиль
Фотография
Рейтинг
 
Опции
Опции
О себе
oriky не указал(а) ничего о себе.
Личная информация
oriky
Новичок
Возраст не указан
Пол не указан
Место жительства не указано
День рождения не указан
Интересы
Нет данных
Другая информация
Смарт: Нет данных
Оператор: Нет данных
Прошивка: Нет данных
Защита от ботов: Нет данных
Статистика
Регистрация: 19.4.2016
Просмотров профиля: 97*
Последнее посещение: --
0 сообщений (0 за день)
Контактная информация
AIM Нет данных
Yahoo Нет данных
ICQ Нет данных
MSN Нет данных
* Просмотры профиля обновляются каждый час

oriky

Пользователь


О себе
Темы
Сообщения
Комментарии
Друзья
Содержимое



















































































































































































































































































Related post: merhom Street, in his sixtv-seventh vear. He was a descendant of Thomas Wight, an emigrant from the Isle of Wight, who came to this coun- tr>' in 1635. Directly after his graduation from the Long Island College Hospital in 1864, he went to the front as an assistant surgeon in a Volunteer regiment, serving until the close of the Civil War. All through his practice, he re- tained a close connection with the Buy Ilosone Long Island Collie Hospital, holding the position of pro- fessor of operative and clinical surgery until the close of his life. He was also consulting surgeon at St. Mary's Hospital and at the Eastern Dis- trict Hospital. He belonged to all the leading medical societies. He invented numerous surgi- cal instruments and was the author of several works including the following: "The Weight and Size of the Body and Its Organs," "Myo- dynamics, or the Dynamics of the Muscles," "A Memorial of Frank Hastings Hamilton, M.D.," "A Bic^aphical Memorial of O. W. Wight, M.D.," and "Suggestions to the Medical Wit- ness." His son, Dr. Jarvis S. Wight, Jr., sur- vives him. CORRESPONDENCE. OUR LONDON LETTER. [From Our Special Correspondent.] London, November 9, 1901. THE REPORTS AS TO THE KING's HEALTH — BAD EFFECT ON TRADE — HOW THE RUMORS MAY HAVE ARISEN — BIRTHDAY HONORS. The rumors as to the King's health to which reference was made in my last letter have caused a good deal of excitement among people of all ranks, and, what is worse, are having a marked influence on the many branches of trade that de- pend on State ceremonials, and the displays and festivities which are the breath of life of a court. During all the long years of her widov/hood Queen Victoria lived in retirement to the serious detriment of those who make it their business to purvey luxuries to the fashionable world. So depressing, indeed, was the eflFect of her long mourning on trade in London, that at one time it threatened seriously to impair her popularity. Court dressmakers, man milliners, carriage builders, jewellers et hoc genus omne, looked forward on the King's accession to a livelier state of things after the official year of moumini^ was over. Rut the fact that these cancer rumors, which have till ?atelv only been current here in whispers, have now been bawled aloud in the press, has made both courtiers and their trades- men verv uneasv. Orders for coronation robes are being countermanded or held in suspense bv peers and high priests and others who ha\'e the privilege of arraying themselves in gorgeous ap- parel on such occasions ; and the result is that a large number of workers of one kind or another who had been engaged by the Court purveyors are being thrown out of employment. I can state with the most positive certainty that there is no shadow of foundation for the rumors. The Court physicians could not go holiday-making in distant parts, as they have been doing quite lately, were there but a cloud no bigger than a man's hand in the farthest comer of die sky ; nor would they be going about in society with every out- ward and visible sign of minds perfectly free from care had they so portentous a secret locked in their breasts. One must have seen the keeper of a sovereign's health when the august patient is really ill to realize the nervous tension caused by such a responsibility. It has not been con- sidered expedient to give any official denial to the rumors ; in the first place, because there are many people who never believe a thing until it has been officially denied ; and, secondly, because if this particular rumor were denied now, an- other to the eflfect that the King had tuberculosis or some other serious ailment would probably have to be denied the next week. The fact is that King Edward has all his life spoken as if he had a plum in his mouth. Like all his family he speaks with a thick guttural voice and a German accent, which people who wish to be thought fashionable try to imitate, to the grievous discomfort of Englishmen, who like to hear their mother-tongue spoken as it should be. The royal voice has with the advance of age acquired a huskiness akin to that noted bv the Lord Chief Justice in Falstaflf, who at- tributed it to "hollooing and singing of an- thems." I do not know whether our gracious sovereign is much given to the singing of an- thems, but he is of full habit and bears about him the signs of a long perseverance in good liv- ing. He smokes a good deal, and suflfers occa- sionally from the pharyngitis that is one of the penalties of over-indulgence in the "herb nico- tian." Twelve or thirteen years ago he consulted Morell Mackenzie about his throat which was then troubling him. The royal patient thought it necessary to assure the physician that he did not drink like one of his brothers at whose palace gate Pale Death has since knocked. The Prince, as he then was, asked the physician if there was any sign of cancer. Doubtless the recent death of the Emperor Frederick had made him anxious, as it did thousands of meaner mortals. But Mackenzie was able to reassure him. Possibly the death of his brother, the Duke of Saxe-Co- burg, better known perhaps as Duke of Edin- burgh, and of his sister, the Empress Frederick, from cancer, may have suggested to His Majesty the possibility of a similar fate for himself. But as far as medical science can pronounce at pres- ent there is, as I have said, not the slightest ap- pearance of a growth in the larynx, nor is there
Related links: Clarinex Online, Abacavir Lamivudine, Where Can I Buy Ginseng Root, Chloroquine Aralen, Buy Exelon Online, Wellbutrin Purchase Online, Order Oxybutynin, buy cipro online, Acetazolamide Online, Purchase Benicar
Просмотры
oriky профиль не имеет просмотров.

Комментарии
Другие пользователи не оставили комментарии для oriky.

Друзья
Друзей нет.
RSS Текстовая версия Сейчас: 30.11.2020, 10:01